A pocket flintlock pistol being cocked by a gentleman of the 18th century

Travel

The growth of trade in the 17th and 18th century generated wealth and a travelling community. However, travelling the roads of England at this time was a dangerous business, as crime was rife.

These traders and travellers represented rich pickings for the highwayman and footpad. In addition, there was no organised force to deter and detect crime. The country was served by local constables and watch patrols who were often inefficient.

In defence of their trade and profits, travellers armed themselves and their transport more heavily than before.

Highwayman film from the gallery

18th century traveler in coach with pistol - link to YouTube video

INDIAN ARMS AND ARMOUR: PHYSICAL, SPIRITUAL AND MYTHOLOGICAL

This special seminar, with Natasha Bennett, Acting Curator (Oriental Collections), will allow delegates to admire and examine weaponry and armour from India at close quarters.

27 February 2016

Leeds

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Did you know?

Going off half-cocked

Many older guns have a form of safety that prevents the gun from being fired when the hammer is pulled halfway back. Sometimes a fault develops which allows the gun to fire when the hammer is in the half-cocked position, before a proper aim can be taken.